Speed dating zero matches

Men and women are rotated to meet each other over a series of short "dates" usually lasting from three to eight minutes depending on the organization running the event.At the end of each interval, the organizer rings a bell, clinks a glass, or blows a whistle to signal the participants to move on to the next date.

At the end of the event participants submit to the organizers a list of who they would like to provide their contact information to.If there is a match, contact information is forwarded to both parties.Speed dating is a formalized matchmaking process of dating system whose purpose is to encourage people to meet a large number of new people.Its origins are credited to Rabbi Yaacov Deyo of Aish Ha Torah, originally as a way to help Jewish singles meet and marry.On the other hand, feedback and gratification are delayed as participants must wait a day or two for their results to come in.

The time limit ensures that a participant will not be stuck with a boorish match for very long, and prevents participants from monopolizing one another's time.

There have been several studies of the round-robin dating systems themselves, as well as studies of interpersonal attraction that are relevant to these events.

Other studies found speed-dating data useful as a way to observe individual choices among random participants.

On the other hand, the random matching precludes the various cues, such as eye contact, that people use in bars to preselect each other before chatting them up.

According to the New York Times, participants in speed dating experience an average of 2 in 10 or 3 in 10 matches.

The first speed-dating event took place at Peet’s Café in Beverly Hills in late 1998.