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Supporting the idea that kissing is learned rather than instinctual is the fact that not all humans kiss.

Certain tribes around the world just don’t make out, anthropologists say.

This kind of match could yield offspring with stronger immune systems, and better chances for survival.

Still, most people are satisfied with the explanation that humans kiss because it feels good.

Back then, mothers may have chewed food and passed it from their mouths into those of their toothless infants.

Even after babies cut their teeth, mothers would continue to press their lips against their toddlers’ cheeks to comfort them.4 - In no event shall be liable to you or anyone else for any direct, special, incidental, indirect or consequential damages of any kind, or any damages whatsoever, including without limitation, loss of profit or the claims of third parties, whether or not advised of the possibility of such loss, however caused and on any theory of liability, arising out of or in connection with the possession or use of the data.5 - You agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Match.com, its affiliated entities, directors, officers and employees from and against any and all liabilities, losses, damages, claims or demands asserted against resulting from your misuse of the data.They formally study the anatomy and evolutionary history of kissing and call themselves philematologists.So far, these kiss scientists haven’t conclusively explained how human smooching originated, but they’ve come up with a few theories, and they’ve mapped out how our biology is affected by a passionate lip-lock.When our faces are close together, our pheromones “talk” – exchanging biological information about whether or not two people will make strong offspring.